Phalloids

“Phalloids” (1971)

Phalloids

an L.L.L. Burlap short story

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The Phalloids had spoken.

But could they have been wrong?

After all, they had been mistaken before, hadn’t they?

Hadn’t they… ?

They hadn’t.

Father had given his life for The Phalloids all those years ago, he fought bravely against the forces of The Mindreading Elite, telepath warriors, a sect of unbelievers. The Phalloids couldn’t be wrong, lives were lost and that couldn’t have been in vain.

“You are the destroyer of The Phalloids. Phalloids are we.”, The Phalloids had said.

How could this be?

Without The Phalloids, our proud city of Phalloidia wouldn’t even have a name!

Or Phalloids!

The very thought gives me chills.

Without them, how would we know of the future? How do you live without knowing what comes next?

Besides, we rely on Phalluid for literally everything. No Phalluid, that creamy, seemingly endless white nectar The Phalloids bless us with every morning, would mean nothing to water the crops, nothing to drink, nothing to wash ourselves with, nothing to make our water taste better.

Chaos.

I can’t let this happen. I won’t.

I will destroy The Phalloids after all.

They were right…

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Look out for more L.L.L. Burlap short stories ONLY on WeTheMindThinkers.

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Norman L. Brisbane – Found Artwork

A piece of art from legendary science fiction writer Norman L. Brisbane, author of such titles as “Beware Their Killing Hooves” and “To Be A Blurgen”, was recovered this week.

The piece appears to be a rough drawn representation of the “Observatorium”, a location mentioned in his final short story “The Red Moons Of NeOrion”. The drawing was made on a scrap piece of paper and found in the inside pocket of the coat he wore when he died. It hadn’t been found until now because the pockets were sawn shut with beard hair, Brisbane’s evidently, and in order to preserve the authenticity of the item, no-one had dared tearing the pockets open.

Thankfully, a moth infestation in the New Jersey Science Fiction Museum opened up a hole big enough from the inside that the mangled piece of paper could be safely extracted.

Here is the powerful image it depicted:

(click on it to enlarge)

The structure conceived by Mr Brisbane looks every bit as imposing as it was described in the story. The vein-like detailing over the entirety of the pole suggesting the metal mentioned, “Expanseon”, had taken over it like a vine eating its way to the top of a tree. The dome looking very much grafted onto the pole almost organically.

The lack of detail on the surrounding “schlouds” would suggest Mr Brisbane was more enamored with the shaft at the center of the piece.

This truly is a major discovery for the world of sci-fi and one hopes that more artworks will be recovered from the legendary writer in time.